Eggnog Creme

Most agree eggnog originated from the early medieval Britain “posset,” a hot, milky, ale-like drink. Monks were known to drink a posset with eggs and figs. Milk, eggs, and sherry were foods of the wealthy, so eggnog was often used in toasts to prosperity and good health.

Eggnog became a holiday drink when it arrived in colonial America in the 1700s. American colonies were full of farms—and chickens and cows—and cheaper rum, a soon-signature ingredient. Mexico adopted the very eggnog varietal “rompope,” and Puerto Rico enjoys the “coquito,” which adds coconut milk. The English name’s etymology however remains a mystery. Some say “nog” comes from “noggin,” meaning a wooden cup, or “grog,” a strong beer. By the late 18th century, the combined term “eggnog” stuck.

To make this favorite holiday drink easy to make try Everyday Eggnog Creme.  Snuggle up with this yummy winter drink and your favorite classic holiday movie